Yujin Lee STARTSEITE


YUJIN LEE – CHRONOS UND KAIROS
25 April – 01 June 2013

OPENING
24 April 2013, 7 – 10 p.m.
The artist will attend

INTRODUCTION
Julika Nehb, art historian, Berlin

 

Yujin Lee STARTSEITE


YUJIN LEE – CHRONOS UND KAIROS
25 April – 01 June 2013

OPENING
24 April 2013, 7 – 10 p.m.
The artist will attend

INTRODUCTION
Julika Nehb, art historian, Berlin


 

MIA-FLORENTINE-WEISS STARTSEITE


MIA FLORENTINE WEISS – PEACE NEVER SLEEPS
Special show during the GALLERY WEEKEND 2013
26 – 28.April 2013

@
MORGEN CONTEMPORARY
PROJECT SPACE
Auguststr. 2a
10117 Berlin


OPENING
25 April 2013, 6 – 9 pm
Live Performance by the artist


OPENING HOURS
Daily Live Performance
26 – 28 April 2013  11 am – 7 pm

 

YUJIN LEE – CHRONOS UND KAIROS
25 April – 01 June 2013

Yujin Lee STARTSEITE


 


 

MIA FLORENTINE WEISS – PEACE NEVER SLEEPS
Special show during the GALLERY WEEKEND 2013
26 – 28.April 2013

MIA-FLORENTINE-WEISS STARTSEITE

 

Inhalt folgt in Kürze.

 

Inhalt folgt in Kürze.

 

YUJIN LEE
CHRONOS UND KAIROS

Text: Julika Nehb
Translation: Brian Poole

Contemporary artistic expression in the medium of drawing is so diverse that the line has become one of its only remaining common denominators. Currently living in Berlin, the South Korean artist Yujin Lee (born 1968) brings one fine line of her pencil after another to paper in a highly concentrated, seemingly meditative process—one vertical, softly shaded line next to another. Taken as a whole, they deliberately coalesce, bringing to life monumental, delicately stylised billowing clouds of smoke.

In various cultures the vertical line is associated with qualities like tension, strength, and stability. In his study of Point and Line to Plane Kandinsky refers to the vertical as “the warm form”. Plato’s line analogy compares all recognisable reality with the notion of a vertical line. In prehistoric cave paintings, the vertical line symbolises the upright posture of the autonomous bipedal human, comparable to Far Eastern philosophies. In the Christian cross, the vertical depicts man’s striving to unite heaven and earth.

In their vertical format—over two metres high—the lines in Yujin Lee’s “Cloud” series develop an extremely sculptural effect. The cloud figurations juxtapose themselves to the spectator, as if they were a physically present interlocutor.

Yujin Lee’s craftsmanship and skill owe much to her traditional classical training both in Korea and in the United States. In addition to the formal aesthetic challenge of capturing the phenomenon of smoke, the choice of her preferred object may be traced to her active political engagement and her continual artistic and personal search for an identity. Due to her prominent interest in the way people, concrete events, and phenomena are presented both in politics and in the media, Lee often avails herself of press photos as models for her work.

Despite their awe-inspiring poetic beauty, the origin of these smoke clouds is as politically charged as it is disquieting. Whether Yujin Lee’s motifs depict an actual previous event remains an open question. As a Symbol, smoke is an index for fire, an indication of its usually dangerous and violent origin. Whether from volcanic eruptions, large conflagrations, exploding bombs, or atomic catastrophes, in the media and in culture clouds of smoke are interpreted as signs of an impending climate catastrophe, as consequences of serious accidents, or as acts of violence intentionally perpetrated by humans. What unites them in their origin, form, and development is their unpredictability and incalculability. Yujin Lee intentionally conceals the origin of her smoke clouds. And thus her drawings can be comprehended as more than an artistic commentary on the disassociation within aesthetic experience, since the artist herself alludes to the reception of smoke clouds in popular culture and in the press. Here, the nuclear mushroom cloud quickly became the stereotypically recognisable sign of the detonation of an atomic bomb; yet at the same time the image—thanks to the unmitigated force of its symbolic content—distracts us from the factually devastating destruction caused by such a detonation.

Moreover, smoke is also a traditional baroque vanitas image—the expiring fumes of an extinguished candle are a reference to death and transitoriness. No doubt, in her “Cloud” series (but particularly in her “Telescope” series—colour chalk drawings that will also be presented at the exhibition) Lee reflects, albeit unconsciously, the trans-generational feeling of growing up in the shadow of the bomb—in a land whose division has been maintained by state force for geostrategic reasons.

The exhibition is named after two mythological deities: Chronos rules over time, and Kairos over the ideal moment. They allude to the paradoxical traits of the artistic object as well as of the medium of drawing. Despite their physical presence, smoke clouds are ephemeral and ungraspable; they dissipate so quickly that one scarcely has the time to reflect upon their origins: their affinity to violence. When they appear torn out of their native context, as they do in Yujin Lee’s drawings, they give one the impression of homelessness, and of being lost. Yet at the same time, in the process of their formal objectification, they appear permanently arrested on paper in an “ideal moment” that captures the phenomenon in all its various facets. Lee adheres to the artistic precept that the working process itself becomes a manifest against the transitory. In their mute presence, subtly vibrating, these formations develop a life of their own, as if a threatening power were breathing behind the lines.

 

 

 

YUJIN LEE
CHRONOS UND KAIROS

Text: Julika Nehb
Translation: Brian Poole

Contemporary artistic expression in the medium of drawing is so diverse that the line has become one of its only remaining common denominators. Currently living in Berlin, the South Korean artist Yujin Lee (born 1968) brings one fine line of her pencil after another to paper in a highly concentrated, seemingly meditative process—one vertical, softly shaded line next to another. Taken as a whole, they deliberately coalesce, bringing to life monumental, delicately stylised billowing clouds of smoke.

In various cultures the vertical line is associated with qualities like tension, strength, and stability. In his study of Point and Line to Plane Kandinsky refers to the vertical as “the warm form”. Plato’s line analogy compares all recognisable reality with the notion of a vertical line. In prehistoric cave paintings, the vertical line symbolises the upright posture of the autonomous bipedal human, comparable to Far Eastern philosophies. In the Christian cross, the vertical depicts man’s striving to unite heaven and earth.

In their vertical format—over two metres high—the lines in Yujin Lee’s “Cloud” series develop an extremely sculptural effect. The cloud figurations juxtapose themselves to the spectator, as if they were a physically present interlocutor.

Yujin Lee’s craftsmanship and skill owe much to her traditional classical training both in Korea and in the United States. In addition to the formal aesthetic challenge of capturing the phenomenon of smoke, the choice of her preferred object may be traced to her active political engagement and her continual artistic and personal search for an identity. Due to her prominent interest in the way people, concrete events, and phenomena are presented both in politics and in the media, Lee often avails herself of press photos as models for her work.

Despite their awe-inspiring poetic beauty, the origin of these smoke clouds is as politically charged as it is disquieting. Whether Yujin Lee’s motifs depict an actual previous event remains an open question. As a Symbol, smoke is an index for fire, an indication of its usually dangerous and violent origin. Whether from volcanic eruptions, large conflagrations, exploding bombs, or atomic catastrophes, in the media and in culture clouds of smoke are interpreted as signs of an impending climate catastrophe, as consequences of serious accidents, or as acts of violence intentionally perpetrated by humans. What unites them in their origin, form, and development is their unpredictability and incalculability. Yujin Lee intentionally conceals the origin of her smoke clouds. And thus her drawings can be comprehended as more than an artistic commentary on the disassociation within aesthetic experience, since the artist herself alludes to the reception of smoke clouds in popular culture and in the press. Here, the nuclear mushroom cloud quickly became the stereotypically recognisable sign of the detonation of an atomic bomb; yet at the same time the image—thanks to the unmitigated force of its symbolic content—distracts us from the factually devastating destruction caused by such a detonation.

Moreover, smoke is also a traditional baroque vanitas image—the expiring fumes of an extinguished candle are a reference to death and transitoriness. No doubt, in her “Cloud” series (but particularly in her “Telescope” series—colour chalk drawings that will also be presented at the exhibition) Lee reflects, albeit unconsciously, the trans-generational feeling of growing up in the shadow of the bomb—in a land whose division has been maintained by state force for geostrategic reasons.

The exhibition is named after two mythological deities: Chronos rules over time, and Kairos over the ideal moment. They allude to the paradoxical traits of the artistic object as well as of the medium of drawing. Despite their physical presence, smoke clouds are ephemeral and ungraspable; they dissipate so quickly that one scarcely has the time to reflect upon their origins: their affinity to violence. When they appear torn out of their native context, as they do in Yujin Lee’s drawings, they give one the impression of homelessness, and of being lost. Yet at the same time, in the process of their formal objectification, they appear permanently arrested on paper in an “ideal moment” that captures the phenomenon in all its various facets. Lee adheres to the artistic precept that the working process itself becomes a manifest against the transitory. In their mute presence, subtly vibrating, these formations develop a life of their own, as if a threatening power were breathing behind the lines.

 

 

 

YUJIN LEE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

2013 Association volume 5, Cornell University, School of Architecture, Art and Planning, USA
2012 In a Vacuum, Solo show catalogue, Gallery DOS, Seoul, South Korea;
Explosion Transforms into Art, article by Seung-pil Hong, Weekly Hankook, South Korea;
Artist Interview: Yujin Lee, Everything is Index, Nothing is History, Germany;
Fan Mail: Lee Yujin, article by Allie Haeussiein, Daily Serving
2011 About Smoke. An interview with Yujin Lee, article by Anna Russ, Berlin Art Link, Germany;
Out in Berlin: Fume Emits, article by Monica Salazar, Berlin Art Link, Germany
2009 Concept, Commerce and Creation Collide, article by Sarah Carpenter, The Cornell Daily Sun, USA
 

YUJIN LEE

BIOGRAPHY

1986 Born in Daegu, South Korea
Lives and works in Berlin, Germany
2006 Studies at Pont-Aven School of Contemporary Art, Pont-Aven, France under Sarah Flohr; Studies at Cornell University in New York City, School of Architecture, Art and Planning, New York, USA under Buzz Spector
2007 Studies at New York University in Shanghai, The Steinhardt School, Shanghai, China under Wolfgang Stiller
2008 Studies at Cornell University in Rome, School of Architecture, Art and Planning, Rome, Italy under Todd McGrain
2009 Studies at Cornell University, School of Architecture, Art and Planning, Ithaca, NY, USA;
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA), Painting
2012 Columbia University Printmaking Summer Intensive, Columbia University School of the Arts, New York, USA under Tomas Vu


SOLO SHOWS

2013 Chronos and Kairos, Morgen Contemporary, Berlin, Germany
2012 In a Vacuum, Gallery DOS, Seoul, South Korea
2011 One Night Stand, Kim’s Bar, Berlin, Germany
Benumbed, Takt Kunstprojektraum, Berlin, Germany


GROUP SHOWS (SELECTION)

2013 Barterlines, Eloquence Magazine Itaewon Kamp, Seoul, South Korea
2012 Drawing Show: No Illusion, Kreuzberg Pavillon Kassel, Kassel, Germany;
NordArt, Kunstwerk Carlshütte, Büdelsdorf, Germany;
Everything is Index, Nothing is History, Invisible Dog, Brooklyn, New York, USA;
Redefining Power, Salon Populaire, Berlin, Germany;
People Against Violence Against People, Pica Pica, Berlin, Germany
2011 We Can Start a Process, Kreuzberg Pavillon Neukölln, Berlin, Germany;
Intersection, Projektraum, Freies Museum, Berlin, Germany;
World Peace Festival Exhibition, Freies Museum, Berlin, Germany;
Fume Emits, loop – raum für aktuelle kunst, Berlin, Germany
2010 Anna Steele & Yujin Lee, Alice Gryphius "Café & Kunstraum", Berlin, Germany;
Myth Hong Empty Room Project, Salon de Myth Hong, Seoul, South Korea;
2009 Painting Structure: Tree and Bomb, Hartell Gallery, Ithaca, NY, USA;
Art Made Money Made Art, Olive Tjaden Gallery, Ithaca, NY, USA


CURATORIAL WORK

2012 Drawing Show: No Illusion, Kreuzberg Pavillon Kassel, Kassel, Germany


AWARDS / HONORS / RESIDENCIES

2013 Berlinerpool archive, Germany
2012 7th SOMA Drawing Center Archive Artist, Seoul, South Korea
2010 – 2011 p:142 Artist-in-Residence, Berlin, Germany
2010 Takt Kunstprojektraum Artist-In-Residence, Berlin, Germany
2008 The Edith Stone and Walter King Memorial Prize, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
2007 David R. Bean Prize in Fine Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
2005 – 2008 Academic Honor Roll, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
 
   

Inhalt folgt in Kürze.